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Lower gravity would have little to no impact on waterbourne creatures. The water pressure is equally distributed all over the body’s surface.

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20 hours ago, ofd said:

The argument is that lightweight bones can be as structurally sound as heavy bones.

No one really makes that claim. The point of lightweight bones is to minimize weight while handling fairly lightweight loads. Not to have heavier bones which aren’t needed when weight is an evolutionary issue.

Bone density is very important for humans, and some older females have a disorder in which their bones are too weak. This has neligble impact on the weight of the woman, who’s muscles, internal parts still weigh exactly the same and the bones are still fairly heavy despite being compromised in strength.

i presume you aren’t claiming the TRex was a svelte lilthe ballet dancer of the dinosaur community. Rather a heavy monster with legs muscles, a tail, and a huge skull protecting an itty little brain. Saving a few pounds on the bone density, despite compromising bone strength, has little impact on the total weight of the creature measured in tonnage. And he/she pales in comparison to the size, height and tonnage of other large herbivores of those earlier epochs.

 

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5 hours ago, Jsbrads said:

Lower gravity would have little to no impact on waterbourne creatures. The water pressure is equally distributed all over the body’s surface.

Actually, yes and no. 

At the surface and at one atmosphere, all the air breathing, waterborne creatures have to deal with is how their Body Mass Index impacts their bouyancy.

The animals which live deeper, have to deal with increased water pressure for every atmosphere they descend into. Question is, how would decreased gravity impact the Atmospheric Threshold?

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2 hours ago, lorry said:

Could you link to me to something that doesn't look like the personal blog of a schizophrenic gypsy fortune teller?

Or this, if we just need to take a break and have a laugh:

 

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It was realized not too long ago, that air breathing “fish” like whales dive far deeper than we originally thought and their body compressed and their density increases as they swim down, only they don’t get “the bends”.

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11 hours ago, Jsbrads said:

It was realized not too long ago, that air breathing “fish” like whales dive far deeper than we originally thought and their body compressed and their density increases as they swim down, only they don’t get “the bends”.

No they don't. And, they also don't have to worry about being crushed in submersibles. Concerns over the bends upon returning to the surface from a deep dive or having an underwater vessel crushed like a tin can are strictly human concerns because we breath compressed air when diving and explore the ocean in man made crafts. Neither of which exist in the animal kingdom.

Deep sea creatures are adapted for the atmospheric pressures they live in, and air breathing creatures are adapted to both the surface and the depths they dive to.

I still wonder how a lesser gravity earth would impact water pressure and/or sea level. 

Found a few interesting experiments of water in space:

Again, zero gravity is not the same as reduced gravity. Currently, I haven't found any experiments with water in a reduced gravity.

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Compressed air isn’t the problem, when whales dive deep below the surface their lungs are crushed by the external pressure and their lungs subsequentially compress the air within. Rather their lungs, blood, blood vessels, etc react differently to the compressed air than ours.

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On 4/2/2018 at 11:07 PM, Jsbrads said:

Compressed air isn’t the problem, when whales dive deep below the surface their lungs are crushed by the external pressure and their lungs subsequentially compress the air within. Rather their lungs, blood, blood vessels, etc react differently to the compressed air than ours.

Actually, compressed air is the difference between a Scuba Diver and a Free Diver.

In free diving, we are in a natural state: http://www.azurediving.com/your-lungs-scuba-diving-vs-free-diving/

I do agree that we are not whales and are not as adapted to deep water atmospheric pressure. 

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