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Donnadogsoth

Poetry and Quotations Thread

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I ask them to take a poem 
and hold it up to the light 
like a color slide 
 
or press an ear against its hive. 
 
I say drop a mouse into a poem 
and watch him probe his way out, 
 
or walk inside the poem’s room 
and feel the walls for a light switch. 
 
I want them to waterski 
across the surface of a poem 
waving at the author’s name on the shore. 
 
But all they want to do 
is tie the poem to a chair with rope 
and torture a confession out of it. 
 
They begin beating it with a hose 
to find out what it really means. 
 

--Billy Collins, "Introduction to Poetry"

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I've heard truth has a power lies cannot possess.

 

That when in distress the truth is something you can count on.

 

It isn't what you feel.

 

It is

 

What is real.

 

Really,

 

its true.

 

The truth allows a person to realize they are not alone in their mind.

 

Inside you'll find that truth doesn't pertain to a thing but to its potential,

 

what remains is essential.

 

The truth doesn't need a name

 

It isn't what is known

 

but is what one comes to know.

 

It is alive

 

Continuing to grow

 

It is worth fighting for?,

 

What are YOU dying for?.

 

The truth is something one may confide,

 

without the truth humanity will cease to survive.

 

A perfect balance.

 

All that is required,

 

is that the world is admired,

 

in all its beauty,

 

in this moment

 

The truth is inspired.

 

I am not what I can say I've done

 

and I am not what you might think

 

I am

 

what I am

 

At any given moment

 

And

 

In that

 

I become distinct

 

 

Take a look around the world,

 

you will find this little girl,

 

at night she may be sleeping sound,

 

sinking deeper beneath the ground,

 

conceding in what

 

she'd once lost

 

and found

 

the truth

 

she found in everything. -Ninja

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THE RING OF POLYCRATES

 

by Friedrich Schiller (1759-1805)

 

PON his battlements he stood,

And downward gazed in joyous mood,

On Samos' Isle, that owned his sway.

"All this is subject to my yoke;"

To Egypt's monarch thus he spoke,--

"That I am truly blest, then, say!"

 

"The immortals' favor thou hast known!

Thy sceptre's might has overthrown

All those who once were like to thee.

Yet to avenge them one lives still;

I cannot call thee blest, until

That dreaded foe has ceased to be."

 

While to these words the king gave vent,

A herald from Miletus sent,

Appeared before the tyrant there:

"Lord, let thy incense rise to-day,

And with the laurel branches gay

Thou well may'st crown thy festive hair!

 

"Thy foe has sunk beneath the spear,--

I'm sent to bear the glad news here,

By thy true marshal Polydore."

Then from a basin black he takes--

The fearful sight their terror wakes--

A well-known head besmeared with gore.

 

The king with horror stepped aside,

And then with anxious look replied:

"Thy bliss to fortune ne'er commit.

On faithless waves, bethink thee how

Thy fleet with doubtful fate swims now--

How soon the storm may scatter it!"

 

But ere he yet had spoke the word,

A shout of jubilee is heard

Resounding from the distant strand.

With foreign treasures teeming o'er,

The vessels' mast-rich wood once more

Returns home to its native land.

 

The guest then speaks with startled mind:

"Fortune to-day, in truth, seems kind;

But thou her fickleness shouldst fear:

The Cretan hordes, well skilled in arms,

Now threaten thee with war's alarms;

E'en now they are approaching here."

 

And, ere the word has 'scaped his lips,

A stir is seen amongst the ships,

And thousand voices" Victory!"cry:

We are delivered from our foe,

The storm has laid the Cretan low,

The war is ended, is gone by!"

 

The shout with horror hears the guest:

"In truth, I must esteem thee blest!

Yet dread I the decrees of heaven.

The envy of the gods I fear;

To taste of unmixed rapture here

Is never to a mortal given.

 

"With me, too, everything succeeds;

In all my sovereign acts and deeds

The grace of Heaven is ever by;

And yet I had a well-loved heir--

I paid my debt to fortune there--

God took him hence--I saw him die.

 

"Wouldst thou from sorrow, then, be free

Pray to each unseen Deity,

For thy well-being, grief to send;

The man on whom the Gods bestow

Their gifts with hands that overflow,

Comes never to a happy end.

 

"And if the Gods thy prayer resist,

Then to a friend's instruction list,--

Invoke thyself adversity;

And what, of all thy treasures bright,

Gives to thy heart the most delight--

That take and cast thou in the sea!"

 

Then speaks the other, moved by fear:

"This ring to me is far most dear

Of all this isle within it knows--

I to the furies pledge it now,

If they will happiness allow"--

And in the flood the gem he throws.

 

And with the morrow's earliest light,

Appeared before the monarch's sight

A fisherman, all joyously;

"Lord, I this fish just now have caught,

No net before e'er held the sort;

And as a gift I bring it thee."

 

The fish was opened by the cook,

Who suddenly, with wondering look,

Runs up, and utters these glad sounds:

"Within the fish's maw, behold,

I've found, great lord, thy ring of gold!

Thy fortune truly knows no bounds!"

 

The guest with terror turned away.

"I cannot here, then, longer stay,--

My friend thou canst no longer be!

The gods have willed that thou shouldst die

Lest I, too, perish, I must fly"--

He spoke,--and sailed thence hastily.

 

[This anonymous translation of "The Ring of Polycrates" was originally published in 1902.]

[Courtesy poetry-archive.com]

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Confucius say,

 

There are three methods that we may learn wisdom:  by reflection, which is noblest; by imitation; which is the easiest; and by experience, which is the bitterest.

  • Upvote 1

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HOPE

 

by Friedrich Schiller

translated by William F. Wertz

 

All people discuss it and dream on end

Of better days that are coming,

After a golden and prosperous end

They are seen chasing and running

The world grows old and grows young in turn,

Yet doth man for betterment hope eterne.

 

’Tis hope delivers him into life,

Round the frolicsome boy doth it flutter,

The youth is lured by its magic rife,

It won’t be interred with the elder;

Though he ends in the coffin his weary lope,

Yet upon that coffin he plants—his hope.

 

It is no empty, fawning deceit,

Begot in the brain of a jester,

Proclaimed aloud in the heart it is:

We are born for that which is better!

And what the innermost voiceconveys,

The hoping spirit ne’er that betrays

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“Tenderness is not weakness, it is fortitude.”

--Pope Francis

 

“If the greatest obstacle in your life is seeing a Confederate battle flag on the background of someone's computer, you need more problems.”

--Ben Shapiro

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"Oh, curse of marriage

That we can call these delicate creatures ours

And not their appetites! I had rather be a toad

And live upon the vapor of a dungeon

Than keep a corner in the thing I love

For others' uses. "

- Othello, Act 3 Scene 3, 273-278

 

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We are living at a time when G. K. Chesterton’s dictum has proven to be true. Meaninglessness does not come from being weary of pain, but meaninglessness comes from being weary of pleasure. We have exhausted ourselves in this indulgent culture”

--Ravi Zacharias

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He giveth more grace when the burdens grow greater,

He sendeth more strength when the labors increase;

To added affliction, He addeth His mercy;

To multiplied trials, His multiplied peace.

When we have exhausted our store of endurance,

When our strength has failed ere the day is half done,

When we reach the end of our hoarded resources,

Our Father’s full giving is only begun.

Fear not that thy need shall exceed His provision,

Our God ever yearns His resources to share;

Lean hard on the arm everlasting, availing;

The Father both thee and thy load will upbear.

His love has no limit; His grace has no measure.

His power has no boundary known unto men;

For out of His infinite riches in Jesus,

He giveth, and giveth, and giveth again!

--Annie Johnson Flint

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"In every age;

In every place;

The deeds of Man;

Remains the same"

-Second Opening, Legend of the Galactic Heroes

 

"A good autocracy is superior to a good democracy; a bad democracy is superior to a bad autocracy"

 

"If the defense of our homeland and self-sacrifice are as necessary as you say, before you tell other people to 'do this and that', how about you actually do it yourselves? What is the most cowardly and shameful thing in human conduct? It is when people with power, and people who flatter them hide in safe places and extol war, force patriotism and self-sacrifice on others, then send them to the battlefield to die. For the sake of peace in the universe, before we continue this fruitless war with the Empire, must not we first start by exterminating such evil parasites?"

-Yang Wenli, Legend of the Galactic Heroes.

"People may need societies, but they do not necessarily need 'nations'."

-Yang Wenli, Legend of the Galactic Heroes.

"An army is a tool for violence, and there are two kinds of violence... Violence to control and oppress, and violence as a means of liberation. You know what we call a national army is fundamentally the former example. It is a pity, but history does not lie. When those in power confront popular opposition, there are not many examples of the army siding with the people. Far from it, in the past in country after country, the army itself evolved into a power structure and came to control the people with violence."

-Yang Wenli, Legend of the Galactic Heroes.

"Someone who cannot hate something cannot love something, either."

-Yang Wenli, Legend of the Galactic Heroes.

 

 

 

 

 

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"The world is an unfair and unjust place; we are ruled by the whims of tyrants and power-seekers. Sometimes our tyrant is a decent man seeking to protect us from other tyrants; other times he’s a lunatic hell-bent on destroying his own Kingdom. Either way, man exists in spite of the Kingdom, not because of it.”

-Ernst Drucker,

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When you come to a fork in the road, take it.

You can observe a lot by just watching.

It ain’t over till it’s over.

- Yogi Berra, philosopher and baseball player.

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“A society without strong beliefs,” declared Regis Debray in his interview with J.P. Enthoven in Le Nouvel Observateur, (October 10, 1981), ” is a society about to die.” Modern liberalism is particularly critical of nationalism. Hence, the question needs to be raised: Can modern liberal society provide strong unifying communal beliefs in view of the fact that on the one hand it views communal life as nonessential, while on the other, it remains impotent to envision any belief – unless this belief is reducible to economic conduct?

--Alain de Benoist and Tomislav Sunic, “Gemeinschaft and Gesellschaft”: A Sociological View of the Decay of Modern Society

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"The Preacher's Boy" by James Whitcomb Riley
 
THE PREACHER'S BOY
 
BY JAMES WHITCOMB RILEY


I rickollect the little tad, back, years and years ago--
"The Preacher's Boy" that every one despised and hated so! 
A meek-faced little feller, with white eyes and foxy hair, 
And a look like he expected ser'ous trouble everywhere: 
A sort o' fixed expression of suspicion in his glance; 
His bare-feet always scratched with briers; and green stains on his pants; 
Molasses-marks along his sleeves; his cap-rim turned behind--
And so it is "The Preacher's Boy" is brought again to mind! 

My fancy even brings the sly marauder back so plain, 
I see him jump our garden-fence and slip off down the lane; 
And I seem to holler at him and git back the old reply: 
"Oh, no: your peaches is too green fer such a worm as I!" 
Fer he scorned his father's phrases--every holy one he had--
"As good a man," folks put it, "as that boy of his was bad!" 
And again from their old buggy-shed, I hear the "rod unspared"--
Of course that never "spoiled the child" for which nobody cared! 

If any neighber ever found his gate without a latch, 
Or rines around the edges of his watermelon-patch; 
His pasture-bars left open; or his pump-spout chocked with clay, 
He'd swear 'twas "that infernal Preacher's Boy," right away! 
When strings was stretched acrost the street at night, and some one got 
An everlastin' tumble, and his nose broke, like as not, 
And laid it on "The Preacher's Boy"--no powers, low ner high, 
Could ever quite substantiate that boy's alibi! 

And did 
nobody like the boy?--Well, all the pets in town 
Would eat out of his fingers; and canaries would come down 
And leave their swingin' perches and their fish-bone jist to pick 
The little warty knuckles that the dogs would leap to lick--
No little snarlin', snappin' fiste but what would leave his bone 
To foller, ef 
he whistled, in that tantalizin' tone 
That made the goods-box whittler blasphemeusly protest 
"He couldn't tell, 'twixt dog and boy, which one was ornriest!"

'Twas such a little cur as this, onc't, when the crowd was thick 
Along the streets, a drunken corner-loafer tried to kick, 
When a sudden foot behind him tripped him up, and falling so 
He "marked his man," and jerked his gun--drawed up and let 'er go! 
And the crowd swarmed round the victim--holding close against his breast 
The little dog unharmed, in arms that still, as they caressed, 
Grew rigid in their last embrace, as with a smile of joy 
He recognized the dog was saved. So died "The Preacher's Boy"! 

When it appeared, before the Squire, that fatal pistolball 
Was fired at "a dangerous beast," and not the boy at all, 
And the facts set forth established,--it was like-befittin' then 
To order out a possy of the "city councilmen" 
To kill 
the dog! But, strange to tell, they searched the country round, 
And never hide-ner-hair of that "said" dog was ever found! 
And, somehow, 
then I sorto' thought--and half-way think, to-day--
The spirit of "The Preacher's Boy" had whistled him away. 

 

 

https://www.accuracyproject.org/t-Riley,JamesWhitcomb-ThePreachersBoy.html

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|clarity, reality, marriage|

fdr podcast 3885 - at around minute 175

"Feelings won't sustain the relationship. [...]If feelings sustained the relationship, everyone would stay married. Because everyone is pretty much happy on their..."

 

'tis true! Thanks for verbalising it Stefan.

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